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English pages for children. English pages for everyone.

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English pages for children. English pages for everyone.

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Babs Bell (Bishop) Hajdusiewicz and her books

Bestselling author Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz, Ms.Ed. is the author of more than 100 books and 350 poems for children, including: Don’t Go Out in Your Underwear!; Phonics through Poetry: Teaching Phonemic Awareness Using Poetry; MORE Phonics through Poetry: Teaching Phonemic Awareness Using Poetry; Rhythm & Rhyme Reader Series; Questions and Answers Series; Jacks and More Jacks, Words! Words! Words!; Words and More Words. She is also author of Steppingstone Stories Series; Peaceful Me and Sometimes I Feel Happy, Sometimes I Feel Sad; three Poetry Works! collections for early childhood through intermediate grades; middle-grades biography Mary Carter Smith: African-American Storyteller; and the Dainty Dinosaur Series.

Hajdusiewicz stars in the Wright Group staff-development video Developing Oral Language and Phonemic Awareness through Rhythm and Rhyme. She has written numerous children's stories, articles for teachers and parents, and has contributed to and edited many elementary textbooks.

An educator for 40 years, Hajdusiewicz taught early childhood, elementary, and special education at all levels, served school districts in Indiana and Michigan as director of special education, and taught graduate and undergraduate education courses at Eastern Michigan and Cleveland State Universities. She founded Booking the Future: Reader to Reader™, a community-involvement literacy program that placed books in the hands and homes of more than 16,000 four, five, and six year olds, and Pee Wee Poetry™, a language development program for children aged two through nine. Hajdusiewicz is a frequent conference keynoter for educators and parents and a popular visiting author in schools across the country and abroad.

Specialties: Poetry for kids; humor; parenting for literacy; school staff development; author of numerous classroom materials; emphasis on phonemic awareness before phonics instruction; building love of learning from infancy onward

(Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz живет и работает в Атланте, штат Джорджия. Она написала более 100 книг и 350 стишков для детей. Своими книгами она предоставляет советы, консультации и материал для воспитателей, чтобы они чувствовали себя уверенно в том, что они помогают детям в период их раннего развития и становления их устной речи. Учителя английского языка могут использовать стихи для изучения языка в целом. Родители могут читать эти нехитрые стихи своим детям и помогать им изучать английский язык.)

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Здесь также:
города и страны
политика и политики
песни из мульфильмов
видео на английском языке
тексты песен и сами песни известных исполнителей
интересные рассказы и стихи в оригинале для детей и взрослых
новости на английском языке
It's an old Middleton family recipe.
16 Hosting Rules Kate Middleton Never Breaks
Prince Philip to retire from public duties at age of 96
Quotes about Life
etc

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The first televised Christmas Broadcast or 'Queen's Speech', filmed at Sandringham House in Norfolk.

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In this year’s broadcast, also known as ‘The Queen’s Speech’, Her Majesty reflects on the year’s events, and encourages us to be grateful ‘for all that brings light to our lives’.

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The State Opening Of Parliament - 18th May 2016

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The Imperial State Crown

The Imperial State crown is somewhat similar in design to St. Edward's crown, as it also consists of four crosses pattée alternating with four fleurs-de-lis, which are topped with two arches and a cross. The Imperial Crown, which is lighter and more comfortable than St. Edward's crown, is worn at the end of the coronation ceremony when the new Sovereign exits Westminster Abbey, as well as for the opening of Parliament each year. In addition, a few monarchs have opted to wear the Imperial Crown instead of the traditional St. Edward's Crown for the entire coronation service, including Queen Victoria and King Edward VII.

The current version of the Imperial State crown is a replica of an earlier one which was made for Queen Victoria. The modern version was created in 1937 by the Crown Jewellers, Garrard and Company. The Imperial Crown boasts a staggering 2,868 diamonds, 273 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds, and 5 rubies. As if this were not enough, the crown is also adorned with several large famous gems which are priceless in their own right, including St. Edward's sapphire, Black Prince's ruby, and the Cullinan II, also known as the Lesser Star of Africa.

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The Imperial State Crown, presented by Queen Elizabeth II in 1970's. Her Majesty in this video speaks about the Imperial State Crown, she explains the use of the Crown and the story behind the Crown's main stones and gems

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Crown Jewels Of Britain

Wold famous Jewel Collection

One of the most priceless collections in the entire world is the British Crown Jewels. This group of regal regalia consists of crowns, scepters, orbs, swords, rings, spurs, as well as the special garments donned by the Monarch for ceremonial events, particularly a coronation. This is a look into the remarkable British Crown Jewels, as well as detailed descriptions and histories on some of the most famous pieces in the collection.

The British Crown Jewels are housed in the Tower of London, where they were moved in 1303, following a theft from Westminster Abbey, where they had previously been stored. Despite several subsequent attempts at theft, the Crown Jewels have been safe in the Tower of London, where they are guarded by the iconic Yeomen Warders, more commonly known as the Beefeaters. This spectacular collection is open for the public to view, drawing millions of tourists, gem lovers, Royal enthusiasts, historians, and the merely curious to the Tower of London each year.

Crown Jewels Destroyed In Enlish Civil war

One of the interesting facts about the British Crown Jewels is that much of the Coronation regalia is still in use in modern times, which sets it apart from the Crown Jewels held by the other royal families of Europe. The British Crown Jewels are fraught with symbolism; so powerful is the meaning of the regalia that the majority of it was destroyed by Oliver Cromwell in 1649 during the English Civil War period. A new set of Crown Jewels was created for the Restoration, when Charles II ascended to the throne. Some of the new pieces were modeled on those that were destroyed, and there is also speculation that some of the gold left when the original crowns were melted down was recast into the new items. One of the few surviving pieces from the original set of Crown Jewels is the 12th Century Anointing Spoon, which is used to anoint the Sovereign with holy oil.

The British Crown Jewels include some legendary and priceless items. The best known include St. Edward's Crown, the Imperial State Crown, the Sovereign's Orb (symbolizing Christ's dominion over the world), the Sovereign's Scepter (or Scepter with the Cross), and the Scepter with the Dove, which represents fairness, justice, and mercy. St. Edward's Crown, which was created in 1661 for the coronation of King Charles II, is the official crown worn when a new Sovereign is crowned. Made of solid gold, encrusted with 444 precious stones, and weighing in at a hefty 4 pounds, 12 ounces, the St. Edward's Crown is almost as famous for its weight as its beauty. Perhaps this is the origin of the saying "heavy hangs the head that wears the crown"

The Imperial State Crown

The Imperial State crown is somewhat similar in design to St. Edward's crown, as it also consists of four crosses pattée alternating with four fleurs-de-lis, which are topped with two arches and a cross. The Imperial Crown, which is lighter and more comfortable than St. Edward's crown, is worn at the end of the coronation ceremony when the new Sovereign exits Westminster Abbey, as well as for the opening of Parliament each year. In addition, a few monarchs have opted to wear the Imperial Crown instead of the traditional St. Edward's Crown for the entire coronation service, including Queen Victoria and King Edward VII.

The current version of the Imperial State crown is a replica of an earlier one which was made for Queen Victoria. The modern version was created in 1937 by the Crown Jewellers, Garrard and Company. The Imperial Crown boasts a staggering 2,868 diamonds, 273 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds, and 5 rubies. As if this were not enough, the crown is also adorned with several large famous gems which are priceless in their own right, including St. Edward's sapphire, Black Prince's ruby, and the Cullinan II, also known as the Lesser Star of Africa.

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The Koh-i-Noor Diamond

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One of the most legendary diamonds in all the world also resides in the Imperial State Crown: the 108.93 carat rose cut diamond called the Koh-i-Noor, which means "Mountain of Light" in Persian. This diamond, which at one time was the largest cut white diamond in the world, has a legendary curse associated with it, much like the Hope Diamond. An ancient Hindu curse stated that, "He who owns this diamond will rule the world, but will also know all of its misfortunes. Only God, or a woman can wear it with impunity.". Interestingly enough, the Koh-i-Noor has most recently been owned by several female world leaders, beginning with Queen Victoria of England, and more recently, Queens Elizabeth I and II.

The origins of the Koh-i-Noor diamond can be traced back to Golconda, India, and according to some accounts, the enormous diamond may have been discovered thousands of years ago. The gem has passed between scores of rulers, from the Sikhs to the Mughals to the Persians. There is a long history of violence around those men who owned the diamond, and it was seized as the spoils of war numerous times. (Perhaps this is where the curse comes in.) One of the most legendary non-European heads of state to own the Koh-i-Noor was Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, whose name meant "King of the World" in Persian. Shah Jahan was best known for building the Taj Mahal palace. It is said that when the Emperor was later imprisoned by his son, the Koh-i-Noor diamond was placed near a window, and that Shah Jahan could view his magnificent Taj Mahal only as a reflection in its facets.

As history held, the Koh-i-Noor once again traded hands as part of the spoils of war. When the British colonized India in 1849, the famous diamond was explicitly mentioned in the Treaty of Lahore, the document that made India a part of the British Empire:

The gem called the Koh-i-Noor which was taken from Shah Shuja-ul-Mulk by Maharajah Ranjit Singh shall be surrendered by the Maharajah of Lahore to the Queen of England.

The astonishingly valuable diamond was formally presented to Queen Victoria on July 3, 1850. In its form at that time, the Koh-i-Noor was remarkably large, but not particularly brilliant, leading to the gemstone being recut in 1852. It is said that Prince Albert, who supervised the recutting of the diamond from 186 1/16 carats down to 105.602 carats, was disappointed at the finished results. Nonetheless, the recut Koh-i-Noor was mounted into a tiara with two thousand smaller diamonds, and was kept at Windsor Castle (unlike most of the Crown Jewels, which are housed in the Tower of London). The Koh-i-Noor continues to be a part of the British Crown Jewel Collection to this day. It was reset into a new platinum crown for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I in 1937. The Koh-i-Noor now resides in the ceremonial artifact called the Imperial State Crown, efforts to reclaim it by Pakistan and India notwithstanding.

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The Cullinan Diamond

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There is another world famous diamond that is a part of the British Crown Jewels (actually, there are many!), and that is the Cullinan I, which is also called the Great Star of Africa. Unlike some of the world's other extraordinary gems, the origins of the Cullinan diamond are much less murky. This is likely because it is a relatively modern discovery, having been unearthed in 1905 in the Premier Diamond Mine in Gauteng, South Africa (Cullinan was the name of the mine owner). The 3106.75 carat rough diamond was one of the largest ever found, and until 1985, the Cullinan I was also the largest polished diamond in the world.
Following its discovery, the Cullinan diamond was purchased by the Transvaal government and then given as a birthday gift to King Edward of England. You may be surprised to hear that the invaluable gem was shipped to London in a plain box via registered parcel post! A decoy stone was sent on a steamer ship with London detectives from South Africa to England to draw any potential thieves.

The breathtaking 3106.75 carat diamond was cut by Joseph Asscher of Amsterdam. He studied the rough diamond for a solid three months before daring to cleave it, and yet on his first attempt, the enormous diamond actually broke the cleaving blade! To destroy such a one-of-a-kind gem would be unthinkable, but fortunately, Mr. Asscher's second attempt was more successful, and the original Cullinan diamond was split into nine large gems and additional smaller ones. The largest of these, the Cullinan I, or Great Star of Africa, weighs in at an impressive 530.20 carats. Along with its sister diamond, Cullinan II, Cullinan I became a part of the British Crown Jewels.

The Great Star of Africa, which has been estimated at a value of over $400 million, is now mounted in the Sceptre with the Cross, which is a ceremonial piece housed in the Tower of London. The Sceptre, which was created in 1661 for the coronation of King Charles II, was reconfigured in 1905 to accommodate the Cullinan I diamond. The cross represents a monarch's secular power under God. For those days when a jewel encrusted sceptre might be a bit too fancy, the 530.20 carat diamond can also be removed and worn as a brooch.

These famous gems, artifacts, and royal regalia make the British Crown Jewels one of the premier gem holdings anywhere in the world. They are rich with history, breathtakingly beautiful, symbols of immense power, and truly priceless. Most of us are accustomed to the comparatively simple jewelry that marks the rites of passage in an average person's life, such as the First Communion cross, the diamond engagement ring, the pearl bridal jewelry, and the anniversary band. To see such indescribably ornate and opulent pieces such as those that make up the British Crown Jewel Collection is an opportunity of a lifetime for anyone fortunate enough to pay a visit to the Tower of London.

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1953. Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II: 'The Crowning Ceremony'

The Crowning.

The Queen sitting in King Edward's Chair, the Archbishop, assisted with other Bishops, come from the Altar: the Dean of Westminster carrying the Crown, and the Archbishop taking the crown did reverently and place it upon the Queen's head. At the sight whereof the people, with loud and repeated shouts, cry,
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN
The Princes and Princesses, the Peers and Peeresses put on their coronets and caps, and the Kings of Arms their crowns; and the trumpets sound, and by a signal given, the great guns at the Tower were discharged.
The acclamation ceasing, the Archbishop says:
"God crown you with a crown of glory and righteousness,
that having a right faith and manifold fruit of good works,
you may obtain the crown of an everlasting kingdom
by the gift of him whose kingdom endureth for ever. Amen."

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The Queen's Longest Reign Elizabeth and Victoria ( BBC Documentaries )

Queen Elizabeth II becomes the longest-reigning monarch in British history on the evening of 9 September 2015. This documentary compares the lives and the reigns of two extraordinary women who have steered their courses through periods of remarkable change: Elizabeth and Victoria. It follows Queen Elizabeth II on engagements in the UK and abroad as she approaches this historic date. With interviews and archive to illustrate the remarkable stories of these two female monarchs.

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The Queen's Speech 2016
The State Opening of Parliament marks the formal start of the parliamentary year and is marked by a speech from Queen Elizabeth.

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Project
Knitted Neck Scarf

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Introduction

When instructed to rib in the pattern below, knit 1, purl 1 alternately across the row. To wear the scarf, slip one end through either of the loops at front.

Finished Size: 4 by 26 inches


materials

    Yarn: 2 skeins (50 grams )sport-weight yarn in desired color, using about 150 yards

    Needles: 2 needles in size U.S. 4 (3 1/2 mm), 1 double-pointed needle in same size. Adjust needle size as necessary to obtain correct gauge (gauge: 5 stitches and 11 rows equal 1 inch in garter stitch)

    Stitch holder

    Tapestry needle

steps

    Cast on 3 stitches.

    Row 1: Knit 2, slip last stitch purlwise.

    Row 2: With yarn in back, knit 1, increase 1 (see how to increase), knit 1, and slip last stitch purlwise.

    Row 3: With yarn in back, knit 1, increase 1, knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise.

    Repeat row 3 until you have 24 stitches. (Piece should now measure about 4 1/2 inches wide.)

    Continue to knit across every row, still slipping last stitch of each row purlwise, until piece measures 4 inches long.

    Divide (see how to divide). When you're finished, half the stitches will be on double-pointed needle and the other half will be on your working needle.

    Rib across the stitches on your working needle (leave the stitches on double-pointed needle as is), still slipping the last stitch purlwise. Continue for 1 1/2 inches. Transfer these ribbed stitches onto stitch holder. Break yarn, leaving a tail long enough to weave in later.

    Rejoin yarn, and rib across the stitches on double-pointed needle for 1 1/2 inches.

    Transfer all stitches onto 1 needle as follows: Slip 1 stitch purlwise from double-pointed needle, then slip 1 purlwise from working needle. Repeat across row until all stitches are on 1 needle.

    Knit every row, slipping last stitch purlwise, for 15 1/2 inches. (To adjust the size of the scarf, knit fewer inches for a child or more for a large adult.)

    Using same method as in step 7, divide the stitches between the 2 needles.

    Repeat steps 8, 9, and 10.

    Knit every row, slipping last stitch purlwise, for 2 1/2 inches.

    To finish: Knit 1, decrease (see how to decrease), and knit to end of row, slipping last stitch purlwise. Repeat this sequence every row until only 3 stitches remain. Bind off. Using tapestry needle, weave in ends.

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Hello there!

Learn to make these adorable pom pom friends. Please share the video and follow me on social media..Let me know what awesome DIY tutorials you would like to see.

=Spoiler написал(а):

DIY Pom Pom Animals

How to make pom pom animals for Easter!

=Spoiler написал(а):

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The Queen

Queen meets Northern Ireland leaders on first leg of visit
Along with Duke of Edinburgh, monarch will visit Game of Thrones set in Belfast and visit Crumlin Road jail

Queen Elizabeth arrives at Hillsborough Castle in Belfast on Monday for the beginning of her two day royal visit to Northern Ireland, and meets with Sinn Féin’s deputy first minister Martin McGuinness.
When asked by McGuinness how she is, the Queen replies, ‘well, I’m still alive’.
The visit is her first public engagement since the UK voted to leave the European Union

The Queen has held a private meeting with deputy first minister and former IRA chief of staff Martin McGuiness on the first leg of her three day tour of Northern Ireland.

It was the third time she has met Sinn Fein's chief negotiator during the peace process, the first handshake between them taking place in 2012 during her Diamond Jubilee visit to Northern Ireland.

She also met first minister Peter Robinson as well as the secretary of state Theresa Villiers on Monday evening.

On Tuesday the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh will pay a visit to Belfast's Crumlin Road jail which during the Troubles held hundreds of republican and loyalist prisoners. The prison in the north of the city is now a museum and also the home of a new whiskey distillery.

The royal couple will also be shown around the interior set of the US fantasy television drama Game of Thrones, which is in the Titanic Quarter of Belfast's docklands, on Tuesday.

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Queen visits Northern Ireland

NI 28 Jun 2016

The Queen and Prince Philip were greeted by large crowds as they arrived in Bushmills on the second day of their visit to Northern Ireland.

The royal visitors saw the Giant’s Causeway and Bushmills village in north Antrim on Tuesday morning.

They attended a service of remembrance and unveiled a statue of local Somme hero Robert Quigg VC, before heading to Coleraine rail station for their North Coast rail journey.
A fantastic reception for The Queen and The Duke at Bellarena, following their journey by rail from Coleraine
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They are travelling by steam train from Coleraine to the new Bellerena Station to mark its opening.

It will be a historic journey for the Queen, as she also took a steam train through Coleraine and Bellarena as part of her coronation tour back in 1953.

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